Arnulf Lüchinger
Architecture
Structuralism Publications
Paintings
Structuralism History [ Summary English German ]


StructuralIsm, configuration of building units – Previ housing,

part of situation plan, Lima Peru 1976 (Aldo van Eyck)

StructuralIsm, configuration of building units – Previ housing,

part of situation plan, Lima Peru 1976 (Aldo van Eyck)

 
 

Structuralism in Dutch Architecture and five former Architectural Movements between 1915-75. In Book 2-Komponenten-Bauweise (Two-Components-Approach) by Arnulf Luchinger. Illustrations of Housing Schemes

 
 

Architects outside
Holland

Architectural Movements
in Holland circa 1915-1975

Architects and Buildings in Holland (the first mentioned architects
are responsible for the building style)

 
 
 

Wright
Wagner
Behrens
El. Saarinen

Berlage is forerunner for
various building
methods and styles

H. Berlage, Beurs Amsterdam, 1903
W. Kromhout, American Hotel Amsterdam, 1901

 
 
 

Tessenow
Muthesius
Schmitthenner
Östberg

Traditionalism

u.o. Delftse School,
often pitched roof
with roof-tiles,
red brick architecture,
natural materials

H. Berlage, Hunting-seat Hoenderlo, 1916
M. Grampré Molière, Housing Estate Vreewijk Rotterdam, 1916-19
A. Kropholler, Housing Estate Kwartellaan Den Haag, 1928
G. Friedhoff, Townhall Enschede, 1933
A. van der Steur, Museum Boijmans Rotterdam, 1935
F. Peutz, Churches in Maastricht 1936, Meyel 1952, Roermond 1954
J. Oud, Office Building Shell, 1938-42 (influenced by Traditionalism)

 
 
 

Mendelsohn
Steiner
Gaudí

Expressionism

Amsterdamse School,
red brick architecture,
sometimes concrete and
and white plaster
(E. Mendelsohn)

M. de Klerk, Housing Block Eigen Haard, Zaanstraat A'dam, 1917-20
M. de Klerk, Boat-house Weesperzijde A'dam, 1923, (demolished)
P. Kramer, Housing Block P.L.Takstraat Amsterdam, 1923

Expressionism of the Amsterdam School – P.L.Takstraat

housing estate, Amsterdam-South 1923 (Piet Kramer)


P. Kramer, Department Store De Bijenkorf Den Haag, 1926
H. Wijdeveld, Housing Block Hoofdweg/J.v.Galenstraat A'dam, 1925
J. Staal, Office Building De Telegraaf Amsterdam, 1929
Many more architects and buildings all over Holland

 
 
   

Loos,
architects
of the
International
Style
(exhibition
1932)

Cubism

De Stijl, International Style,
architecture of pure
geometric forms,
white architecture,
Dudok Wils and Berlage
brick architecture
or grey plaster

J. Oud, Villa Allegonda Katwijk aan Zee, 1917
G. Rietveld, Prototype of the Red-Blue-Chair, 1918
M. Dudok, Bavinck School, 1921
J. Wils, Housing Estate Papaverhof Den Haag, 1922
G. Rietveld, Schröder House Utrecht, 1924
J. Oud, Housing Estates: Hoek van Holland, 1924-27

Cubism in architecture – Weissenhof housing estate,

Stuttgart 1927 (Jacobus Johannes Pieter Oud)

,
Kiefhoek Rotterdam 1925-29, Weissenhof Stuttgart 1927

Cubism in architecture – Weissenhof housing estate,

Stuttgart 1927 (Jacobus Johannes Pieter Oud)


M. Stam, Housing Estate Weissenhof Stuttgart, 1927
J. Staal, "Skyscraper" Victoriaplein Amsterdam, 1929
M. Dudok, Townhall Hilversum, 1924-30
M. Dudok, Department Store De Bijenkorf R'dam, 1930, (destroyed)
H. Berlage (and E. Strasser), Gemeentemuseum Den Haag 1931-35

 
   
   

Eiffel
Maillart
Russian Constructivism
Mies van der Rohe
Schindler
Williams
Industrial architecture
Engineer construction
Shipbuilding

Constructivism

Construction as architectural
expression,
poetic concrete Constructivism,
Constructivism with glass
curtain wall, combination of
Cubism and Constructivism,
steel Constructivism

M. Stam, Constructivistic projects since 1922, Project Railway
Station Genève-Cornavin 1925
L. van der Vlugt (and M. Stam), Van-Nelle-Factory R'dam, 1926-29
L. van der Vlugt and W.v.Tijen, Apartm.build. Bergpolder R'dam, 1934

Constructivism – Bergpolder apartment building, 1934

Rotterdam (Leendert van der Vlugt and Willem van Tijen)


L. van der Vlugt, Feijenoord Stadium Rotterdam, 1936
J. Duiker and B. Bijvoet, Sanatorium Zonnestraal Hilversum, 1926-28
J. Duiker, Open Air School Cliostraat Amsterdam, 1930
J. Duiker, Cineac Reguliersbreestraat Amsterdam, 1933-34
F. Peutz, Department Store Schunck Heerlen, 1933

 
   
 
 

Groupe of
Russian
Avant-garde,
H. Meyer
Schmidt
Teige

Rationalism

Radical Functionalism without
preconditions of aesthetics
and style, without form quality
as criterion, without personal
architectural handwriting.
With modern technology,
light, air, green and sun,
field of work is architecture
and urban planning

Urban planner C. van Eesteren, architects W. van Tijen and
B. Merkelbach (author of the Manifesto De 8 in 1927) and
engineer J. Wiebenga are representatives of Functionalism,
without preconditions of style. The aesthetic quality of their
buildings and towns varies, depending on the co-operating
partners. Attempts to design and build on a scientific basis. In the
30-s the Dutch Rationalists are strongely involved in the CIAM
(Congrès internationaux d'architecture moderne) with themes as
Rational Planning Methods (Rationelle Bebauungsweisen)
and Functional City (Die Funktionelle Stadt). Their theoretical
starting point is formulated in the CIAM-declaration of 1928:
"Urban planning can never be determined by aesthetic
considerations but exclusively by functional conclusions."

 
 
 
 

Le Corbusier a.o.

Structuralism, configuration units:

buildings, constructions, streets, ...


Kahn
Tange
Team Ten (Bakema, Candilis,
A. and P. Smithson,
van Eyck a.o.)

Structuralism

Aesthetics of Number
urban structure with
coherence, growth, change, identities, sense-of-place, articulation

Van den Broek and Bakema a.o., Housing Projects Pendrecht, 1949

Structuralism, configuration of dwelling units – Project

Pendrecht 1949 (Van den Broek & Bakema, Jan Stokla)


and Alexanderpolder 1956, in Rotterdam
A. van Eyck, Orphanage Amsterdam, 1958-60

Structuralism, aesthetics of number – Municipal

orphanage, Amsterdam 1960 (Aldo van Eyck)


H. Hertzberger, Factory Extension Lin Mij A'dam 1964, (demolished)
P. Blom, Housing Kasbah Hengelo 1973, Oude Haven R'dam 1985
J. Verhoeven a.o., Housing Estate Berkel-Rodenrijs, 1973

Structuralism, configuration of dwelling units – Berkel-Rodenrijs

housing estate 1973 (Jan Verhoeven et al.)


A. and H. van Eyck, European Space Centre Estec Noordwijk, 1989

 
 

Le Corbusier Algiers Proj.

Resident participation, different architects – Fort l'Empereur

housing project, Algiers 1934 (Le Corbusier)

Supports (Habraken)
Diocletian Palace Split
Arenas Arles and Lucca
Amsterdam plan,
Gridiron a.o. schemes
Tange Tokyo Bay Plan
Candilis a.o. FU Berlin

2-Components-Approach
polyvalent form and
individual interpretations,
architecture as half-product
for user participation,
relationship between
social and built structures,
pluralistic architecture

H. Hertzberger, 8 Experimental Houses Diagoon Delft, 1971

Structuralism, resident participation inside and outside – Diagoon

housing estate, Delft 1971 (Herman Hertzberger)


H. Hertzberger, Centraal Beheer Apeldoorn (inside), 1972
L. Kroll, Student Centre St. Lambrechts-Woluwe Brussel (B), 1976
L. Kroll, Reorganisation Residential Quarter Perseigne (F), 1982
Housing Estate Peninsula Borneo A'dam, 1996-2000

Cubism in architecture, resident participation, different architects –

Peninsula Borneo, A'dam 2000 (Adriaan Geuze, masterpl. and coord.)

, masterplan
WEST8 (A. Geuze) 1993, houses by different architects
Housing Estate Brandevoort Helmond, 2001

Traditionalism, resident participation, different architects – Brandevoort

housing estate, Helmond 2001 (Rob Krier, masterplan and coordination)

, masterplan
R. Krier a.o., houses by different architects (Traditionalism)

 
 

In a general sense Structuralism is a mode of thought of the 20th Century that came about in various places, at various times and
in various disciplines such as linguistics, anthropology, art and architecture. Structuralism in architecture and urban planning is
a reaction against Ciam-Functionalism (Rationalism) which resulted in lifeless cities without the identities of its inhabitants
and urban forms. Basic themes of the Structuralist movement are: - Relationship between social organisation and built structures,
depending on the archaic principles of human nature. - Coherence, growth and change at all stages of the urban structure.
Sense-of-place. Identifying devices. Articulation. - Polyvalent form and individual interpretations. Participation of the user in
housing. Integration of high culture and low culture. Pluralistic architecture.
Statements and other texts by the protagonists of the architectural movement are quoted on page Structuralism Publications.

   
 
 
 

Illustration on top: A. van Eyck, Previ Housing Lima (PE), Part of Situation Plan, 1969-76

 
 
   

Expressionism of the Amsterdam School – P.L.Takstraat

housing estate, Amsterdam-South 1923 (Piet Kramer)

 

Cubism in architecture – Weissenhof housing estate,

Stuttgart 1927 (Jacobus Johannes Pieter Oud)

 

Constructivism – Bergpolder apartment building, 1934

Rotterdam (Leendert van der Vlugt and Willem van Tijen)

 

Structuralism, configuration of dwelling units – Project

Pendrecht 1949 (Van den Broek & Bakema, Jan Stokla)

 

Structuralism, configuration of dwelling units – Berkel-Rodenrijs

housing estate 1973 (Jan Verhoeven et al.)

 

Structuralism, aesthetics of number – Municipal

orphanage, Amsterdam 1960 (Aldo van Eyck)

 

Structuralism, configuration units:

buildings, constructions, streets, ...

 

Resident participation, different architects – Fort l'Empereur

housing project, Algiers 1934 (Le Corbusier)

 

Traditionalism, resident participation, different architects – Brandevoort

housing estate, Helmond 2001 (Rob Krier, masterplan and coordination)

Cubism in architecture, resident participation, different architects –

Peninsula Borneo, A'dam 2000 (Adriaan Geuze, masterpl. and coord.)

                             

         

   

[English version] Article by Arnulf Luchinger in architectural book: Tomas Valena et al., "Structuralism Reloaded - Rule-Based Design in Architecture and Urbanism", page 87-95, Stuttgart-London 2011. Contribution to International Symposium in
Munich, November 19-21, 2009.
"Dutch Structuralism as an architectural movement was recognized and launched internationally by the Swiss architect Arnulf Luchinger since 1974," (Francis Strauven in video Vimeo 2014, Studium Generale, 04:40).


Structuralism in Architecture and Urban Planning 
Developments in the Netherlands - Introduction of the Term

I Previous Architectural Movements
II Development of Structuralism - Introduction of the Term
III Literature and Annotations
IV Illustrations

I    Previous Architectural Movements

1900-1930 In 1901, a new national housing act is adopted in the Netherlands. Towns with more than 10,000 inhabitants are required to draw up structure and land-use plans for city expansion.[24] Since the profession “urban planner” does not exist at this point, the best architects are called in to draw up the plans. The well-known architect Hendrik Berlage receives a number of urban development commissions from Amsterdam and other cities. Because the Netherlands escaped destruction in World War I, the projects can be implemented without financial obstacles. The urban structure in Amsterdam-South planned by Berlage, together with the infills of the Expressionist architects of the 1920s, proves to be very successful.[26] Later, a more functional architecture develops. The upcoming Rationalists are opposed to Expressionist architecture on principle, a critique that includes the masterpieces of this movement.
1927 The manifesto of rationalism as formulated by Ben Merkelbach and the “De 8” Group is directed against the expressionism of the Amsterdam School. The movement coins new terms such as “a-aesthetic, a-dramatic, a-romantic, and a-cubistic”. New slogans used by rationalists include: “Better ugly buildings than parade architecture,” “Against talented individuals,” “Rational architecture by builders who are industrial organizers,” and “More science than art."[25]
1928 In the 1928 CIAM declaration rationalist architects state: "Urban planning can never be determined by aesthetic considerations, but exclusively by functional conclusions."[25]
1929 Le Corbusier writes as follows about emerging rationalism: "Today, in the avant-garde groups of the ’Neue Sachlichkeit’, two words have been eliminated: Architecture (the art of building) and Art. They’ve been replaced by Building and Living." [26] That same year Cornelis van Eesteren becomes an employee of the new urban development office in Amsterdam. From 1929 to 1959 he works successively as a designer, urban planner, and head of the urban planning department. Originally a member of De Stijl, he later joins the rationalist movement.
1930 Cornelis van Eesteren is elected president of CIAM. The election may be regarded as a tribute to the Netherlands’s contribution to modern architecture (Rietveld, Oud, Duiker, Van der Vlugt, Dudok, Berlage, etc.). Subsequently the new president is to play a neutral role between rival architects such as Le Corbusier and Walter Gropius. The fact that van Eesteren is elected CIAM president is, at the time, probably an intelligent decision on an international level. For the Netherlands itself, van Eesteren’s “lofty” CIAM status proves to be detrimental as well. A number of Dutch rationalists leverage this situation in their dealings with politicians.
1938 From 1938 to 1949 the new district Bos en Lommer is built in Amsterdam West for 35,000 inhabitants. The overall urban planning concept is by van Eesteren, and the architecture is designed by Merkelbach and others. Bos en Lommer is part of the well-known 1935 General Expansion Plan (AUP) of Amsterdam. [24] The Bos en Lommer district is severely criticized by the Forum architects. (See 1959, below.)
1946 After studying architecture at the ETH Zurich from 1938 to 1942, Aldo van Eyck takes his first job in the Netherlands, working in the urban planning office in Amsterdam, headed by van Eesteren, from 1946 to 1951. Van Eyck works with the urban planning team in drawing up the rationalist AUP plan, but his critical attitude causes conflict in the design team. Subsequently van Eyck is given a new job designing children’s playgrounds. In spite of this demotion, he makes the best of his new task, designing hundreds of playgrounds that later become notable. Thus, in the Amsterdam urban planning office two ways of thinking collide: the rationalist world of CIAM president van Eesteren and the more culturally based world of van Eyck. [21}

II    Development of Structuralism - Introduction of the Term
1947 For CIAM in Bridgwater van Eyck writes his “Statement against Rationalism”, representing the beginning of a new view of architecture. [1]
1949 At the Bergamo CIAM, Van den Broek & Bakema present their residential project, Pendrecht, located in the vicinity of Rotterdam. It is the first project in the well-known series of configurative urban design plans for Pendrecht and Alexanderpolder spanning the period between 1949 and 1956.
Van Eyck is on friendly terms with the young painters of the Cobra movement. He is responsible for the presentation of the first – legendary – Cobra exhibition in Amsterdam in 1949. A second exhibition follows two years later in Liège.
1951 In his lifetime van Eyck travels widely on all continents, often to visit “primitive” cultures. One of his noteworthy journeys takes him to the Hoggar Desert in Central Africa and involves a great deal of difficulties and tensions. Among the ten members of the travelling team is the well-known Cobra painter Corneille.
1953 CIAM in Aix-en-Provence features a tour of Le Corbusier’s Unité d’Habitation in Marseilles. The future Team 10 begins its activity with critical discussions of architecture and urban planning.
1959 The Otterlo congress, organized by Team 10, is held at the Kröller-Müller Museum. The 42 invited architects from various countries include Louis Kahn and Kenzo Tange. CIAM is dissolved. A number of presentations are later interpreted as the beginning of structuralism. The periodical Forum 7/1959, which is the program for the congress, presents an aerial photograph of Cornelis van Eesteren’s Bos en Lommer district as a negative example. Aldo van Eyck comments, “Seldom were the possibilities greater and seldom has a profession failed so badly.” As more up-to-date solutions the periodical presents the 1949-1956 urban planning projects by Van den Broek & Bakema (Pendrecht and Alexanderpolder) and a student project by Piet Blom. Van Eyck introduces the term ‘aesthetics of number’. [2]
In the subsequent issue, Forum 8/1959, Herman Hertzberger shows configurations constructed of matchboxes. In a modified form this idea returns in Habitat 67 by Moshe Safdie, who is familiar with the periodical Forum.
1960 This year marks the genesis of one of the most famous utopian projects of the new movement, Tange’s Tokyo Bay Plan. Individual ideas can be traced in the projects presented in Otterlo, for instance, Alison and Peter Smithson’s motorway unit in London and the linear structure of Van den Broek & Bakema’s urban planning project Alexanderpolder. [4] Tange works with the principle later referred to as ‘structure and coincidence’ or the ‘two-components approach’. [5]
The Amsterdam Orphanage by van Eyck is completed.
1961 John Habraken publishes the book Supports: An Alternative to Mass Housing in which he campaigns for user participation in housing. [5] Others refer to his idea as structure and infill.
1962 Until 1959 van Eyck lectures on architecture at the Amsterdam Academy of Architecture. His configurative principle of design is influential among the students of this school. In 1962 Piet Blom concludes his architecture studies with the project Noah’s Ark, involving a residential town for roughly 150,000 people consisting of 11 residential units housing 10,000 to 15,000 people each. Before Blom’s graduation, van Eyck presents this project at the 1962 Team 10 meeting in Royaumont. The project is violently criticized, particularly by Alison and Peter Smithson. From today’s perspective the Noah’s Ark Project may be regarded as an aberration of the ‘aesthetics of number’ principle – a formalistic study, a labyrinth of streets without identifying devices. It is a student project with little reference to reality. In parallel with Blom, van Eyck works on a similar configuration for the Amsterdam district of Buikslotermeer. The unsuccessful student project Noah’s Ark may be one reason why configurative design was not introduced at the Delft Technical University (Delft TU) in the 1970s. (See discussion in [21].)
At the same time, a countermovement, the ‘two-components approach’, is developed. As a continuation of Habraken’s idea, Bakema publishes the Forum 2/1962 issue about resident participation in Diocletian’s Palace in Split. Also, Bakema shows the perspective drawing of the project Fort l'Empereur by Le Corbusier from the book La Ville Radieuse. The following year, the structure plan of the Free University of Berlin is drawn up by Candilis Josic & Woods representing the same approach.
In 12 pages of Forum 5/1962, 24-year-old Moshe Safdie presents a housing project that is a precursor of his later Habitat 67 in Montreal.
1963 Compared with van Eyck’s 1960 Amsterdam Orphanage, which embodies the principle of ‘aesthetics of number’, the award-winning competition project for the Free University of Berlin by Candilis Josic & Woods is one of the most influential prototypes of the ‘two-components approach’. However, the University, completed in 1973, does not completely live up to the high expectations of the original project. Critics find fault particularly with its architectural quality.
1966 Kenzo Tange publishes the article “Function, Structure and Symbol, 1966” in which, on the one hand, he writes about functionalism. On the other hand, he uses phrases such as “to give structure to the forms of the buildings” and makes statements such as “This is the process I call structuring”. The Japanese term ‘structurism’ is not introduced until 1970, by Udo Kultermann. [11]
Herman Hertzberger takes part in a competition for a new city hall in Valkenswaard in the Netherlands. The jury commission comments as follows on his configurative design: “This design is more reminiscent of a structure than of a building. If a movement in the architecture of today considers this conception to be correct, then it will also have to recognize the latter to be correct in the case of this city hall. It is the opinion of the commission that it cannot be expected to judge the ideological background on the basis of which this design was developed, as expressed in the explanation attached thereto." [14]
According to Francis Strauven, Piet Blom is supposed to have introduced the term structuralism at this time. However, Strauven provides no references. [21]
1967 Eight hundred architects participate in the international competition for the new Amsterdam city hall. A number of Dutch designers, particularly former students and lecturers from the Amsterdam Academy of Architecture, submit configurative projects. When the projects are judged in 1968, Wilhelm Holzbauer is awarded first prize. The jury includes Jacques Schader from Zurich and Hugh Maaskant from Rotterdam, among others. Although Herman Hertzberger’s design is among the most interesting configurative projects, it is not awarded a prize. [9,15]
1969 In reference to this architectural competition, Arnaud Beerends writes the article "A Structure for the Town Hall in Amsterdam” for the periodical TABK 1/1969. [9] He discusses four configurative projects by the architects Gert Boon, Leo Heijdenrijk, Herman Hertzberger, and Jan Verhoeven. Beerends uses the terms structuralism and structuralist, probably marking the first time they appear in the architectural literature. His point of departure is the ‘aesthetics of number’ concept, formulated in 1959 by Aldo van Eyck. In his definition Beerends writes: "Structural form can be recognized by the uniformity and autonomy of the elements. Configuration, which is determined by the autonomous forms, makes a hierarchical structure of main and auxiliary rooms impossible.” [9,21] In contrast with this view, in the ‘two-components approach’ that is formulated later, only the structure is autonomous while the elements are exchangeable and modifiable. [16] Beerends uses the new terms exclusively for configurative buildings in the Netherlands; in 1969, there are only about half a dozen of these in existence.
1970 In the spring of 1970, a colloquium-cum-exhibition takes place in Hasselt, Belgium, titled “Renewing Dutch Architecture”. [10] An unbound A4 portfolio includes previously published articles by Herman Hertzberger, Piet Blom, Jan Verhoeven, and Frank van Klingeren, among others. The article mentioned above, Beerends’s “A Structure for the Town Hall in Amsterdam” [9] is reprinted, although it appears in two parts titled "Competition Town Hall Amsterdam" and "Structuralism". Participating in the Hasselt colloquium are several well-known Dutch architecture journalists; however, they do not subsequently continue to use the term structuralism.
This year, Udo Kultermann writes the introduction to the book Kenzo Tange, calling the architectural movements functionalism and structurism. [11]
1973 Herman Hertzberger edits Forum 3/1973, titled "Homework for More Hospitable Form". [12] The periodical provides the syllabus for his lectures at the Delft TU and offers a good overview of the topic. At one point in the last section he uses the terms ‘language’ and ‘speech’, but does not mention the main concept, structuralism, on which the terms are based. On principle Hertzberger does not speak or write about structuralism, since, according to Aldo van Eyck, the Forum architects are not allowed to launch a new movement at the Delft TU. (See 1975, Aldo van Eyck.)
The periodical TABK 5/1973 publicizes Hertzberger’s completed office building, Centraal Beheer. Beerends devotes a longer article to the building, titled "Valkenswaard-Amsterdam-Apeldoorn: De hink-stap-sprong van Herman Hertzberger". [13] What is striking about the article is the fact that Beerends resuscitates the term structuralism, although he uses it very inconspicuously, and only once, in the text but not in the titles nor on the cover. Possibly TABK’s nine-member editing team is not interested in launching structuralism in Dutch architecture, or is afraid that the term might be misinterpreted.
At the Delft TU, the architect Willem van Tijen – an opponent of the Forum architects – receives an honorary doctorate. Together with Cornelis van Eesteren and Ben Merkelbach, he is one of the most influential representatives of rationalism. Van Tijen is able to form a study group with students in order to contribute to the ongoing development of architecture. Moreover, in 1970, he received the State Prize for Architecture and Art. Although van Tijen is trained as an irrigation engineer, he is able to make his career in the rationalist movement in architecture. On the title page of his biography appears his well-known statement, “I am a Rationalist, but there is more in the world." [27]
1974 In 1973, as a student at the Delft TU (1971-1976) and foreign correspondent for the journal Bauen+Wohnen (B+W), I receive the editors’ consent to publish an article titled "Structuralism" in the B+W 5/1974 issue [14]. For me the motive for this article is the fact that in the Netherlands, 1972-1974 marks the appearance of a whole series of configurative buildings and residential developments, for example, Centraal Beheer, the Kasbah, de Meerpaal, Berkel-Rodenrijs, Leusden. These projects give the impression that a new architectural movement is manifested here, with shared principles of design and form. For me the term used at the Delft TU, "Forum architecture", is too open-ended to describe the nature of the new architecture. An appropriate name is needed for the new movement, but the Delft TU does not provide one. (See 1975, Aldo van Eyck.)
The name structuralism comes from outside the Delft TU. The first thing that comes to mind is the Japanese term ‘structurism’, formulated in 1970 by Udo Kultermann. [11] Subsequently I discover Arnaud Beerends’s Dutch term “structuralism" in the journal mentioned above, TABK 5/1973 [13], when publicizing Centraal Beheer.
I personally use structuralism as a collective term for all international contributions to the new movement. This international character has been expressed since the special issue titled “Structuralism" in B+W 1/1976 [15]. My definition of structuralism is based on a two-component architecture, where the structure is autonomous and the elements are variable. [16] This definition is also used in other fields of specialization.
1975 Conversations and reports before the publication of the special issue on "Structuralism – A New Trend in Architecture" in B+W 1/1976 [15] are as follows:
Aldo van Eyck In a discussion in which Herman Hertzberger also participates, van Eyck tells me that the so-called Forum architects (Professors Bakema, Van Eyck, and Hertzberger) at the Delft TU are not allowed to launch a new architectural movement. The reason for this agreement is that from 1925 to 1955 the Department of Architecture has to a large degree been molded by traditionalism, the so-called ‘Delft School’. The administration is determined to prevent the emergence of a ‘Second Delft School’. The result of this agreement is that at this point the term structuralism is never used at the Delft TU, neither in lectures nor in scientific publications, student periodicals, or conversations.
Herman Hertzberger As correspondent for B+W, in 1974 I propose to the editors the compilation of an entire issue on Dutch architecture. In 1975 I repeat the proposal, this time with the title "Structuralism". The editors are cautious and do not want a pseudo-structuralism. In the fall of 1975, in response to my request, Hertzberger writes a letter to the editors of B+W in support of my proposal. As a result, the editors in Zurich rearrange the entire 1976 editorial program and plan to make structuralism the subject of their first issue for 1976.
Piet Blom In a conversation I ask Blom whether he would like to participate in an issue on structuralism. I also tell him that Herman Hertzberger will provide publication material on the home for the elderly, De Drie Hoven. Blom’s reaction to this remark is very emotional: "De Drie Hoven, that’s fascist, I don’t want to be part of it." I did not find out until later that there was a violent discussion about fascism in 1962 at the Team 10 meeting in Royaumont. Apparently the discussion about the project Noah’s Ark was still vivid in Blom’s mind as late as 1975. At the presentation of the Helmond Cube Houses I see him again, this time in a cheerful and alert mood.
John Habraken For the provisional table of contents of B+W 1/1976, I ask Herman Hertzberger for a critical comment. He mentions two points. First, he makes a proposal to visit Jan Verhoeven, since Verhoeven has many model photographs of configurations. Second, he says, "You shouldn't forget John Habraken." I reply that I am familiar with the SAR discussions and projects, but would not like to include these in my issue. Hertzberger then remarks, "But you have to read 'De dragers en de mensen'" (English: Supports: An Alternative to Mass Housing). [5]
Arnaud Beerends Beerends uses the term structuralism in 1969 and 1973 in the Dutch architecture journal TABK. I get in touch with him by phone. He is friendly, but does not offer much information and refers me to the architectural historian Geert Bekaert in Antwerp, who he says is much more familiar with the new Dutch movement. Bekaert is one of the few who do not respond. With regard to Beerends, I later hear that he was trained as a sculptor and painter at the Rijksakademie in Amsterdam. He works as a lecturer on art, an editor, and an artist.
Jürgen Joedicke A professor at the University of Stuttgart, Joedicke is also the publisher of "Dokumente der Modernen Architektur" and is an editor of the journal Bauen+Wohnen. Few people in the German-speaking world are as knowledgeable about Dutch architecture and Team 10 as Joedicke. Thanks to his knowledge and activities, he played an essential role in the emergence and dissemination of structuralism. In contrast to Arnaud Beerends, who is accountable to a nine-person editorial staff, my own contacts are uncomplicated and trouble-free, with Joedicke as the only and deciding editor.
1976 At the same time that the special issue "Structuralism – A new trend in architecture" [15] appears in Munich and Zurich, there is a conflict at the Delft TU between a group of Marxists and five professors, including Aldo van Eyck and Herman Hertzberger. The group ousts these professors for more than a year. The existence and power of the Marxists in Delft is a result of the student movement of 1968. This suggests that the Forum architects during this period are not the representatives who set the tone in the Department of Architecture. In spite of opposition from various directions, Herman Hertzberger, most notably, succeeds in exerting a noticeable influence on architectural education with his lectures.
1980 October 1980 marks the publication of the book Structuralism in Architecture and Urban Planning. [16] The publication date given in the book (1981) does not correspond exactly to reality. Although Aldo van Eyck has never considered himself to be a structuralist, he makes the greatest personal contribution to this book of all the architects who participated. He is especially interested in making his texts more precise. He marks the many edits with colored felt markers on transparent paper. In the last
report he writes: "For so much work, I’d like copies (some copies of the book). Lots of luck A.v.Eyck."
1981 This year marks the dissolution of Team 10. [23]

III    Literature and Annotations

Structuralism first phase
[1] Aldo van Eyck, "Statement against Rationalism 1947,” in Aldo van Eyck – Writings, eds. Vincent Ligtelijn and Francis Strauven (Amsterdam, 2008).
[2] Forum, Dutch architectural magazine, Amsterdam and Hilversum since 1946. For the issues 7/1959-3/1963 and July/1967 the editorial team consists of Aldo van Eyck, Jacob Bakema, Herman Hertzberger et al. In Forum 7/1959 Aldo van Eyck introduces the concept ‘Aesthetics of Number’. (D+E)
[3] Kenzo Tange, Tokyo Bay Plan 1960, published in [11]. Tange works with the principle later called the ‘Two-Components Approach’.
[4] Oscar Newman, CIAM '59 in Otterlo (Stuttgart, 1961). (E+G)
[5] N. John Habraken, Supports (London, 1972). De dragers en de mensen (Amsterdam, 1961). Die Träger und die Menschen (The Hague, 2000); in combination with: Arnulf Lüchinger, 2-Komponenten-Bauweise - Struktur und Zufall (Two-Components-Approach - Structure and Coincidence).
[6] Team 10, in 1962 categorical rejection of the urban project ‘Noah’s Ark’ by Piet Blom (Aesthetics of Number), discussion in [21].
[7] Candilis Josic & Woods, project FU Berlin 1963, in [23]. "Two-Components Approach,” alternative design principle to ‘Aesthetics of Number’.
[8] Kenzo Tange, "Function, Structure and Symbol 1966,” in [11]. Includes statements such as "to give structure to the forms of the buildings" and "this is the process I call structuring."
[9] Arnaud Beerends, "Een structuur voor het raadhuis van Amsterdam," TABK (1/1969), Heerlen. (D) Probably the first publication of the terms ‘Structuralism’ and ‘Structuralists’, used for the Netherlands architecture scene. Definition in relation to the ‘Aesthetics of Number’, i.e., configuration with autonomous elements.
[10] Jaak Janssen, Luk Vanmaele and Aimé Vos, Vernieuwende nederlandse architectuur (Hasselt Belgium, 1970). (D)
A4-portofolio for colloquium in Hasselt Belgium with previously published articles by Herman Hertzberger, Piet Blom, Jan Verhoeven, Frans van Klingeren et al. The article "Een structuur..." by Arnaud Beerends [9] is reprinted in two parts, "Prijsvraag Raadhuis Amsterdam" and "Strukturalisme".
[11] Udo Kultermann, Kenzo Tange (Zurich, 1970). (E+G+F) In the introduction Udo Kultermann uses the term ‘Structurism’.
[12] Herman Hertzberger, "Homework for more hospitable form," Forum (3/1973). (D+E) In the last section Hertzberger writes about ‘Language and speech’, but avoids the main concept, ‘Structuralism’, because at the Delft Technical University no architectural movement may be launched.
[13] Arnaud Beerends, "Valkenswaard-Amsterdam-Apeldoorn: De hink-stap-sprong van Herman Hertzberger," TABK (5/1973), Amsterdam. (D) The term structuralism, lowercased, is used in the text once.
[14] Arnulf Lüchinger, "Strukturalismus - Symbol der Demokratisierung," B+W (5/1974), Zurich-Munich. (G)
[15] Arnulf Lüchinger, "Structuralism - A new trend in architecture," B+W (1/1976): 5-40, Zurich-Munich. (G+F+E), International projects in the introductory article, followed by Netherlands projects and buildings.
[16] Arnulf Lüchinger, Structuralism in Architecture and Urban Planning (Stuttgart, 1980). (G+E+F) Structuralism interpreted as an international movement. Definition in relation to the principle ‘Two-Components Approach’ and ‘Structure and Coincidence’. The structure is autonomous, the elements are changeable.

Structuralism second phase (reactions in the Netherlands)
[17] Rem Koolhaas, "Structuralism," International Architect (3/1980): 48-50. Article reprinted in [22].
[18] Hans van Dijk, "The demise of structuralism," Yearbook 1988-89, Architecture in the Netherlands, (Deventer, 1989). (D+E) An alleged discussion between H.v.D. and A.L. did not take place. In his 1999 survey work, Twentieth-Century Architecture in the Netherlands Hans van Dijk negates structuralism.
[19] Wim J. van Heuvel, Structuralism in Dutch Architecture (Rotterdam, 010 Publishers, 1992). (D+E) According to Wim van Heuvel, space structuring construction is the fundamental principle of structuralism. Herman Hertzberger does not include this interpretation in his bibliography.
[20] Paul Vermeulen, "The Hereafter of Structuralism," Archis (12/1993), Rotterdam. (D+E) An alleged discussion between H.v.D. and A.L. did not take place.
[21] Francis Strauven, Aldo van Eyck - The Shape of Relativity (Amsterdam, D 1994, E 1998). Extensive biography of Aldo van Eyck. Strauven does not accept the architectural term structuralism and refers to it as a terminological mistake.
[22] Rem Koolhaas, "Structuralism," S,M,L,XL (Rotterdam, 1995), 283-287. Koolhaas is talking about "a local doctrine of Dutch structuralism, a mere mannerism, reaching a phase of extreme decadence in which it has become responsible for an acute crisis of legibility." What Koolhaas means by legibility can be seen in his “Giant Spider” (M-gebouw) in front of the main railroad station of The Hague, probably under construction since 2010. This project will be the most megalomaniac building in the Netherlands.
[23] Max Risselada and Dirk van den Heuvel, Team 10 - In Search of a Utopia of the Present (Rotterdam, 2005). The shift of focus during recent decades from architecture to urbanism is expressed in an exemplary manner in this book, with many examples. Different views about structuralism, from Kenneth Frampton to Dirk van den Heuvel, as a representative of the Delft Technical University.

Additional literature
[24] Sigfried Giedion, Space, Time and Architecture (Cambridge, MA, 1941).
[25] Ulrich Conrads, Programs and Manifestoes on 20th-Century Architecture (Cambridge, MA, 1975).
[26] Thilo Hilpert, Die Funktionelle Stadt (Braunschweig, 1978), 230. Le Corbusier visits the Netherlands in February 1932 and writes admiringly about "gigantic efforts in urban development. The scales are those of a whole, and the districts are built all at once." Cornelis van Eesteren’s urban development does not appear until later.
[27] Ton Idsinga and Jeroen Schilt, Architect W. van Tijen, 1894-1974 (The Hague, 1987).

IV    Illustrations
Ill.1 Aldo van Eyck, Estec Space Center in Noordwijk, restaurant building, 1989. Structuralism as an unchangeable work of art.
Ill.2

Structuralism, configuration of cube houses with pencil – Oude

Haven, district centre in Rotterdam-Blaak 1985 (Piet Blom)

Piet Blom, Center Rotterdam-Blaak, 1985. Configuration with Cube houses and Pencil as an example of urban 'identifying devices'.
Ill.3

Structuralism, aesthetics of number outside, gridiron plan for participation inside –

Centraal Beheer office building, Apeldoorn 1972 (Herman Hertzberger)

Herman Hertzberger, office building Centraal Beheer Apeldoorn, 1972. Building CB1 on the right: 'aesthetics of number' outside, 'two-components approach' inside, with five superimposed gridiron plans. User participation in office building.
Ill.4 and ill.5

Structuralism, resident participation inside and outside – Diagoon

housing estate, Delft 1971 (Herman Hertzberger)

Herman Hertzberger, housing development Diagoon Delft, 1971. Structure and infill. Resident participation, inside and outside. 'Interpretable architecture'.
Ill.6 and ill.7

Manhattan, gridiron plan, overarching structure, interpretable

urban design – Commissioners Map 1807 and status today

Manhattan, 1807 structure plan and status today. 'Interpretable urban design'.
Ill.8

With structure factor, articulation of built volume – Project

League of Nations, Geneva 1927 (Le Corbusier)

Le Corbusier, League of Nations Geneva, 1927. Project with 'structure factor'. The symmetric structure articulates the volume and determines possible extensions. The structure is not visible.
Ill.9

Without structure factor, extensions increase amorphousness – Project

League of Nations, Geneva 1927 (Hannes Meyer and Hans Wittwer)

Hannes Meyer and Hans Wittwer, League of Nations Geneva, 1927. Project without 'structure factor'. Possible extensions increase amorphousness and lead to structural chaos.

[Translation from German to English by Ilze Mueller. Languages: G=German, E=English, F=French, D=Dutch]

 
   

Structuralism, configuration of cube houses with pencil – Oude

Haven, district centre in Rotterdam-Blaak 1985 (Piet Blom)

 

Structuralism, aesthetics of number outside, gridiron plan for participation inside –

Centraal Beheer office building, Apeldoorn 1972 (Herman Hertzberger)

 

Structuralism, resident participation inside and outside – Diagoon

housing estate, Delft 1971 (Herman Hertzberger)

 

Manhattan, gridiron plan, overarching structure, interpretable

urban design – Commissioners Map 1807 and status today

 

With structure factor, articulation of built volume – Project

League of Nations, Geneva 1927 (Le Corbusier)

 

Without structure factor, extensions increase amorphousness – Project

League of Nations, Geneva 1927 (Hannes Meyer and Hans Wittwer)

       
                                           
   

[German version] Deutsche Version des obenstehenden Artikels und weitere Abschnitte. Beitrag zum Internationalen Symposium “Structuralism Reloaded - Rule-Based Design in Architecture and Urbanism”,  
München 19.-21. November 2009.
"Der niederländische Strukturalismus als Architekturströmung wurde erkannt und international lanciert durch den Schweizer Architekten Arnulf Lüchinger seit 1974," (Francis Strauven in Video Vimeo 2014, Studium Generale, 04:40).

Strukturalismus in Architektur und Städtebau  
Entwicklungen in den Niederlanden - Entstehung des Begriffs

I Expressionismus, Rationalismus und Strukturalismus
II Strukturalismus: Formale und ideologische Aspekte
III Städtebau (projektierte und realisierte Beispiele)
IV Anmerkungen Bijlmermeer
V Anmerkungen Städtebau
VI Nachschrift vom 1. Dezember 2009

I      Expressionismus, Rationalismus und Strukturalismus in der niederländischen Architektur des 20. Jhdts. 

1900-1930 Im Jahr 1901 wird in den Niederlanden ein neues nationales Wohnungsbaugesetz angenommen. Städte mit mehr als 10'000 Einwohnern müssen Strukturpläne erstellen für die Stadterweiterungen. Da offiziell noch keine “Städteplaner” bestehen, werden die besten Architekten für die Strukturpläne gefragt. Der Architekt Hendrik Berlage liefert 1915 einen überarbeiteten Plan für Amsterdam-Süd und arbeitet an weiteren Plänen für Den Haag und andere Städte. In den 1920er Jahren wird der Strukturplan Amsterdam-Süd von Berlage ausgeführt zusammen mit den Architekten des Expressionismus der Amsterdamer Schule. Für ausländische Architekten wird Amsterdam das Mekka des neuen Städtebaus. Le Corbusier besucht 1932 die Niederlande und schreibt begeistert über diese Reise: "... vom Land der Unternehmungen, die eine nationale Seele sorgfältig, regelmässig, chronometrisch modelliert haben. Gigantische Anstrengungen des Städtebaus. Die Massstäbe sind die eines Ganzen und die Viertel sind auf einmal gebaut." (Thilo Hilpert, “Die Funktionelle Stadt”)
Da die Niederlande vom Ersten Weltkrieg verschont geblieben sind, können die Städtebaupläne ungehindert ausgeführt werden. Die Bemerkungen von Le Corbusier betreffen den Städtebau von Berlage (zusammen mit den Architekten des Expressionismus) und nicht die Resultate der späteren CIAM-Rationalisten. Jedermann ist sich bewusst, dass nach dem Expressionismus eine sachlichere Architektur entstehen muss. Der niederländische Expressionismus wird durch die Rationalisten vierzig Jahre lang aus Unverständnis negativ beurteilt und verschrieen.
1927Das Manifest des Rationalismus von Ben Merkelbach und der Gruppe “De 8” richtet sich gegen den erfolgreichen Expressionismus der Amsterdamer Schule mit den neuen Schlagwörtern:
"... a-ästhetisch, a-dramatisch, a-romantisch, a-kubistisch. Besser hässlich bauen als Paradearchitektur. Gegen talentierte Individuen. Rationelle Architektur durch bauende Betriebs-Organisatoren. Mehr Wissenschaft als Kunst usw." (Ulrich Conrads, “Programme und Manifeste”)
1928 In der CIAM-Erklärung von 1928 formulieren rationalistische Architekten:
"Städtebau kann niemals durch ästhetische Überlegungen bestimmt werden, sondern ausschliesslich durch funktionelle Folgerungen." (Ulrich Conrads, “Programme und Manifeste”)
1929 Über den aufkommenden Rationalismus schreibt Le Corbusier 1929:
"Heute hat man in den Avantgarde-Gruppen der Neuen Sachlichkeit zwei Wörter getötet: Baukunst und Kunst. Man hat sie ersetzt durch Bauen und Leben." (Thilo Hilpert, “Die Funktionelle Stadt”)
In diesem Jahr wird Cornelis van Eesteren angestellt im neuen Städtebauamt von Amsterdam. Von 1929-1959 arbeitet er nacheinander als Entwerfer, Stadtplaner und Leiter der Stadtplanung. Er ist ursprünglich Mitglied von “De Stijl”, danach Vertreter des Rationalismus.
1930 Cornelis van Eesteren wird zum Präsidenten der CIAM gewählt. Die Wahl kann als Anerkennung des niederländischen Beitrags an die moderne Architektur gesehen werden (Rietveld, Oud, Duiker, van der Vlugt, Dudok, Berlage, usw.). Im Weiteren soll der neue Präsident eine neutrale Rolle spielen zwischen den rivalisierenden Architekten wie Le Corbusier und Walter Gropius. Die Wahl von Cornelis van Eesteren als CIAM-Präsident ist damals wahrscheinlich eine intelligente Entscheidung auf internationaler Ebene. Für die Niederlande selbst wirkt sich der "hohe" CIAM-Status von Van Eesteren auch nachteilig aus. Verschiedene niederländische Rationalisten machen Gebrauch von diesem Status im Umgang mit Politikern und Ministern.
1938 Von 1938-1949 wird in Amsterdam-West der neue Stadtteil “Bos en Lommer" gebaut für 35'000 Einwohner. Das städtebauliche Gesamtkonzept stammt von Cornelis van Eesteren, die Architektur von Merkelbach und anderen. "Bos en Lommer" ist ein Teil des bekannten Allgemeinen Ausbreitungsplanes (AUP) von Amsterdam aus dem Jahr 1935. Der Stadtteil "Bos en Lommer" wird 1959 durch die Forum-Architekten stark bekritisiert. (Siehe unter 1959, Aldo van Eyck.)
1946 Nach seinem Studium an der ETH Zürich von 1938-42 tritt Aldo van Eyck in den Niederlanden seine erste Stelle an und arbeitet von 1946-51 im Städtebauamt von Amsterdam, wo Cornelis van Eesteren die Leitung hat. Van Eyck arbeitet im städtebaulichen Entwurfsteam an der Realisierung des rationalistischen AUP-Planes. Durch seine kritische Einstellung entsteht ein Konflikt im Entwurfsteam. In der Folge erhält Van Eyck eine andere Aufgabe, nämlich als Entwerfer von Kinderspielplätzen. Trotz dieser Degradierung holt er aus seiner neuen Tätigkeit das Beste heraus und entwirft Hunderte von Kinderspielplätzen, die später bekannt werden. Im Städtebauamt von Amsterdam stossen also zwei verschiedene Denkwelten aufeinander: Die rationalistische Denkwelt des CIAM-Präsidenten Cornelis van Eesteren und die mehr kulturell unterlegte Denkwelt von Aldo van Eyck. (Siehe auch Francis Strauven, “Aldo van Eyck”.)
1947 Für den CIAM-Kongress in Bridgwater schreibt Aldo van Eyck sein Statement against Rationalism als Beginn einer neuen Architekturauffassung.
1949 Beim CIAM-Kongress in Bergamo wird das Siedlungsprojekt Pendrecht bei Rotterdam von Van den Broek & Bakema gezeigt. Es ist das erste Projekt der bekannten Serie Städtebaupläne von Pendrecht und Alexanderpolder.
Aldo van Eyck ist befreundet mit den jungen Malern der Cobra-Bewegung. Sein Beitrag an diese Bewegung besteht aus der Einrichtung der ersten und legendären Cobra-Ausstellung in Amsterdam im Jahr 1949. In Liège folgt eine weitere Ausstellung im Jahr 1951.
1951 Zeit seines Lebens unternimmt Aldo van Eyck viele Reisen auf allen Kontinenten und oft zu archaischen Kulturen. Eine der denkwürdigen Reisen führt bis zur Wüste Hoggar in Zentralafrika, die mit viel Strapazen und Spannungen verbunden ist. Einer der zehn Reiseteilnehmer ist der bekannte Cobra-Maler Corneille.
1953 CIAM-Kongress in Aix-en-Provence mit Besichtigung der Unité von Le Corbusier in Marseille. Beginn der Tätigkeit des späteren Team 10 mit seinen Diskussionen über Architektur und Städtebau.
1959 Otterlo-Kongress im Kröller-Müller-Museum, der durch das Team 10 organisiert ist. Zu den 42 Teilnehmern gehören die Team-10-Mitglieder, aber auch Louis Kahn, Kenzo Tange und andere Architekten. Verschiedene Präsentationen werden später als Beginn des Strukturalismus interpretiert. Auflösung der CIAM. Im Programm des Otterlo-Kongresses (Zeitschrift Forum 7/1959) wird der Stadtteil "Bos en Lommer" von Cornelis van Eesteren als negatives Beispiel gezeigt. Dazu schreibt Aldo van Eyck:
"Selten waren die Möglichkeiten grösser und selten hat ein Fach so versagt."
Als zeitgenössische Lösungen sind die Städtebauprojekte Pendrecht und Alexanderpolder von Van den Broek & Bakema und ein Studentenprojekt von Piet Blom publiziert. In dieser Zeitschrift führt Aldo van Eyck auch den Begriff Aesthetics of Number ein.
In der folgenden Ausgabe Forum 8/1959 zeigt Herman Hertzberger Konfigurationen mit Zündholzschachteln. In abgewandelter Form kommt diese Idee zurück im "Habitat 67" von Moshe Safdie, der die Zeitschrift Forum kennt.
1960 In diesem Jahr entsteht eines der berühmtesten Utopie-Projekte der neuen Bewegung, der Tokyo-Bay-Plan von Kenzo Tange. Einzelne Vorstufen dieses Planes können bei den Projekten in Otterlo nachgewiesen werden wie z.B. bei der projektierten
Autobahneinheit in London von Alison und Peter Smithson und bei der Linearstruktur des Städtebauprojekts Alexanderpolder von Van den Broek & Bakema.
1961 John Habraken publiziert das Buch “Die Träger und die Menschen" als Impuls für die Benutzerpartizipation. Es ist zudem einer der ersten Schritte in die Richtung des später benannten Prinzips Struktur und Zufall im Städtebau, mit dem sich auch Kenzo Tange 1960, Bakema 1962 und Candilis Josic & Woods 1963 beschäftigen.
1962 Bis 1959 ist Aldo van Eyck Architekturdozent an der Akademie für Baukunst in Amsterdam. Sein konfiguratives Entwurfsprinzip ist einflussreich bei mehreren Studenten. In 1962 schliesst Piet Blom sein Architekturstudium ab mit dem Projekt "Arche Noah". Dabei handelte es sich um eine Wohnstadt für etwa 150'000 Einwohner, die aus elf Wohneinheiten von 10-15'000 Einwohnern besteht. Vor dem Studienabschluss von Piet Blom präsentiert Aldo van Eyck dieses Projekt beim Team-10-Kongress in Royaumont im Jahr 1962. Es entsteht eine heftige Kritik, die vor allem durch die Smithsons geführt wird. Aus heutiger Sicht kann das Projekt Arche Noah als eine Fehlentwicklung der Ästhetik der Anzahl gesehen werden, als eine formalistische Studie, ein Irrgarten von Strassen ohne jegliche Erkennungszeichen (Identifying devices). Es ist ein Städtebau-Projekt des 28-jährigen Studenten Piet Blom, das noch wenig Realitätsgehalt besitzt. Parallel mit Piet Blom beschäftigt sich auch Aldo van Eyck mit einer ähnlichen Konfiguration für den Stadtbezirk Buikslotermeer in Amsterdam. Das Studienprojekt "Arche Noah" ist vielleicht ein Grund, dass in den 1970er Jahren das konfigurative Entwerfen an der TU Delft nicht eingeführt wird. (Siehe auch Francis Strauven, “Aldo van Eyck”.)
Zu diesem Zeitpunkt entsteht eine wichtige Gegenbewegung in der Architekturentwicklung. Als Fortsetzung der Idee von John Habraken publiziert Bakema das Forum 2/1962 über die Bewohnerpartizipation im Diokletian-Palast von Split. Im nächsten Jahr folgt das Projekt der FU in Berlin von Candilis Josic & Woods mit einem ähnlichen Entwurfsprinzip.
Im Forum 5/1962 publiziert der 24-jährige Moshe Safdie auf 12 Seiten ein Wohnungsbauprojekt als Vorläufer seines späteren "Habitat 67" in Montréal.
1963 Gegenüber dem Waisenhaus von Aldo van Eyck aus 1960 (Ästhetik der Anzahl) wird das prämierte Wettbewerbsprojekt der FU Berlin von Candilis Josic & Woods der Prototyp einer neuen Architekturauffassung, die später als "Struktur und Zufall" oder "2-Komponenten-Bauweise" bezeichnet wird.
1966 Kenzo Tange publiziert seinen bekannten Artikel Funktion, Struktur und Symbol, 1966. Darin schreibt er einerseits über den Funktionalismus und anderseits über Begriffe wie "strukturelle Auffassung", "Struktur verleihen" und "Strukturprozess". Der japanische Begriff Strukturismus wird erst 1970 eingeführt durch Udo Kultermann.
Herman Hertzberger beteiligt sich am Wettbewerb für ein neues Rathaus in Valkenswaard. Zu seinem konfigurativen Entwurf schreibt die Jury-Kommission:
"Dieser Entwurf erinnert mehr an eine Struktur als an einen Bau. Wenn eine Strömung in der heutigen Architektur diese Auffassung als richtig erachtet, dann wird sie diese auch in Bezug auf dieses Rathaus erkennen müssen. Die Kommission stellt sich auf den Standpunkt, dass es nicht ihre Aufgabe sein kann, ein Urteil auszusprechen über die ideologischen Hintergründe, worauf dieser Entwurf auf Grund der beigelegten Erläuterung entwickelt wurde."
Zu diesem Zeitpunkt soll Piet Blom die Benamung Strukturalismus eingeführt haben laut Francis Strauven, der aber keine Belege vorlegt.
1967 beteiligen sich 800 Architekten am internationalen Wettbewerb für das neue Rathaus in Amsterdam. Verschiedene niederländische Architekten, vor allem ehemalige Studenten und Dozenten der Akademie für Baukunst, liefern konfigurative Projekte ein. Bei der Beurteilung in 1968 erhält Wilhelm Holzbauer den ersten Preis. In der Jury ist u.a. Jacques Schader aus Zürich und Huig Maaskant aus Rotterdam. Der Entwurf von Herman Hertzberger gehört zu den interessantesten konfigurativen Projekten, wird aber nicht prämiert.
1969 Über diesen Wettbewerb schreibt der Architekturkritiker Arnaud Beerends den Artikel „Een structuur voor het raadhuis van Amsterdam“ (Eine Struktur für das Rathaus von Amsterdam) in der Zeitschrift TABK 1/1969. Er behandelt vier konfigurative Projekte von den Architekten Gert Boon, Leo Heijdenrijk, Herman Hertzberger und Jan Verhoeven. Beerends verwendet dabei die Begriffe Strukturalismus und Strukturalisten, wahrscheinlich das erste Mal in der Fachliteratur. Er geht von der "Ästhetik der Anzahl" aus, die Aldo van Eyck 1959 formuliert hat. In seiner Definition schreibt Beerends: "Der Strukturaufbau ist zu erkennen an der Gleichförmigkeit und Autonomie der Elemente. Die Konfiguration, die durch die autonomen Formen bestimmt wird, macht einen hierarchischen Aufbau von Haupt- und Hilfs-Räumen unmöglich." Im Gegensatz zu dieser Auffassung ist bei der später formulierten 2-Komponenten-Bauweise nur die Struktur autonom und sind die Elemente auswechselbar und veränderbar. Arnaud Beerends verwendet die neuen Begriffe ausschliesslich für die niederländische Architekturszene, wobei 1969 erst etwa ein halbes Dutzend konfigurative Bauten bestehen.
1970 Im Frühjahr 1970 wird im belgischen Hasselt ein Kolloquium mit Ausstellung durchgeführt mit dem Titel "Vernieuwende nederlandse architectuur" (Neue niederländische Architektur). Als Begleitschrift dient eine ungebundene A4-Mappe mit Artikeln von und über Herman Hertzberger, Piet Blom, Jan Verhoeven, Frank van Klingeren und andern. Der oben genannte Artikel von Arnaud Beerends wird erneut abgedruckt, diesmal in zwei Teilen mit den Überschriften “Wettbewerb Rathaus Amsterdam” und “Strukturalismus”. Am Kolloquium nehmen mehrere bekannte niederländische Architekturpublizisten teil, die den Begriff Strukturalismus später nicht weiterverwenden.
In diesem Jahr erscheint das Buch "Kenzo Tange" mit dem Einleitungsartikel von Udo Kultermann, der die Architekturströmungen Funktionalismus und Strukturismus erwähnt.
1973 Der Architekt Willem van Tijen, neben Cornelis van Eesteren und Ben Merkelbach einer der drei einflussreichsten niederländischen Rationalisten und Gegenspieler der Forum-Architekten, erhält den Ehrendoktor an der TU Delft. Hier bekommt er auch die Erlaubnis, eine Studiengruppe mit Studenten zu formen, um einen Beitrag an die weitere Architekturentwicklung zu liefern. 1970 hat er zudem den Staatspreis für Architektur und Bildende Kunst erhalten. Willem van Tijen ist ausgebildet als Bewässerungsingenieur, kann aber in der rationalistischen Architekturbewegung Karriere machen. Auf der Titelseite seiner Biographie steht sein bekannter Ausspruch: "Ich bin ein Rationalist, aber es ist mehr auf der Welt."
Im gleichen Zeitpunkt publiziert Herman Hertzberger die Zeitschrift Forum 3/1973 mit dem Titel "Homework for more hospitable form" (Hausarbeit für eine gastfreiere Form) in niederländischer und englischer Sprache. Die Zeitschrift dient als Syllabus für seine Vorlesungen an der TU Delft und gibt ein gutes Bild von seinem Themenkreis. Herman Hertzberger verwendet den Begriff Strukturalismus prinzipiell nicht, da die Forum-Architekten keine neue Strömung lancieren dürfen an der TU Delft. (Siehe unter 1975, Aldo van Eyck.)
Die Zeitschrift TABK 5/1973 publiziert das fertiggestellte Bürogebäude Centraal Beheer von Herman Hertzberger. Arnaud Beerends schreibt einen längeren Begleitartikel mit dem Titel "Valkenswaard-Amsterdam-Apeldoorn: De hink-stap-sprong van Herman Hertzberger" (Der Drei-Sprung von Herman Hertzberger). In diesem Artikel fällt auf, dass Beerends den Begriff Strukturalismus erneut, aber nur einmal im Text und nicht bei den Titeln verwendet. Möglicherweise ist die 9-köpfige Redaktion der Zeitschrift TABK nicht interessiert, den Strukturalismus der niederländischen Architektur zu lancieren oder ist vorsichtig wegen einer eventuellen Fehlinterpretation.
1974 Als Student an der TU Delft (1971-1976) und Auslandkorrespondent der Zeitschrift Bauen+Wohnen (B+W) erhalte ich 1973 von der Redaktion die Zustimmung, einen Artikel "Strukturalismus" zu publizieren in der Ausgabe B+W 5/1974. Das Motiv für diesen Artikel besteht für mich darin, dass in den Niederlanden von 1972-74 eine ganze Serie konfigurativer Bauten und Siedlungen in Erscheinung tritt: Centraal Beheer, die Kasbah, de Meerpaal, Berkel-Rodenrijs, Leusden usw. Sie geben den Eindruck, dass sich eine neue Architekturströmung manifestiert mit gemeinsamen Entwurfs- und Formprinzipien. Die an der TU Delft verwendete Bezeichnung "Forum-Architektur" ist für mich zu freibleibend, um die neue Architektur zu beschreiben. Für die neue Strömung ist ein geeigneter Name notwendig, der aber nicht geliefert wird durch die TU Delft. (Siehe unter 1975, Aldo van Eyck.)
Der Name Strukturalismus kommt von ausserhalb der TU Delft. Als erstes dient sich der japanische Begriff "Strukturismus" an, der 1970 durch Udo Kultermann formuliert wird bei der Publikation des Werks von Kenzo Tange. Im Weiteren fällt mir 1973 die Nennung des Wortes "Strukturalismus" auf im oben genannten Artikel von Arnaud Beerends in der Zeitschrift TABK 5/1973, bei der Publikation von Centraal Beheer.
Nachdem die neue Bezeichnung in Publikationen bis anhin nur kleingedruckt vorgekommen ist, besteht der nächste Schritt darin, den Strukturalismus in der Architektur als Sammelbegriff zu verwenden, auch für verwandte internationale Beiträge. In der Themanummer “Strukturalismus – Eine neue Strömung in der Architektur” der Zeitschrift B+W 1/1976 kommt dies zum Ausdruck.
1975 Gespräche und Berichte bei der Zusammenstellung der Themanummer "Strukturalismus" im B+W 1/1976:
Aldo van Eyck In einer Diskussion, bei der auch Herman Hertzberger teilnimmt, erzählt mir Aldo van Eyck, dass die sogenannten Forum-Architekten (die Professoren Bakema, Van Eyck und Hertzberger) an der TU Delft keine neue Architekturströmung lancieren dürfen. Der Grund dieser Absprache liegt darin, dass die Architekturabteilung der TU Delft von 1925-55 weitgehend durch den Traditionalismus, die sogenannte "Delfter Schule" (Delftse School) geprägt ist. Die Verwaltung will mit allen Mitteln das Aufkommen einer zweiten "Delfter Schule" verhindern. Die Absprache hat zur Folge, dass der Begriff Strukturalismus an der TU Delft nirgends verwendet wird, weder in Vorlesungen, noch in wissenschaftlichen Publikationen, Studentenzeitschriften und Gesprächen. Eine angebliche Diskussion (zwischen Architekturpublizist H.v.D. und mir) während meiner Studienzeit an der TU Delft hat nie stattgefunden. So weit ich mich erinnern kann, ist der Begriff Strukturalismus an der TU Delft das erste Mal verwendet in der Studentenzeitschrift “B-Nieuws” im Oktober 1976 durch den ausländischen Studenten Umberto Barbieri.
Herman Hertzberger Nach dem Erscheinen meines ersten Strukturalismus-Artikels in 1974 mache ich der Redaktion von B+W den Vorschlag, eine ganze Ausgabe über die niederländische Architektur zusammenzustellen. In 1975 wiederhole ich den Vorschlag, diesmal mit dem Titel "Strukturalismus". Die Redaktion ist vorsichtig und möchte keinen Pseudo-Strukturalismus. Auf meine Anfrage schreibt Herman Hertzberger im Herbst 1975 einen Brief an die Redaktion von B+W zur Unterstützung meines Vorschlags. Das hat zur Folge, dass die Redaktion in Zürich das ganze Redaktionsprogramm von 1976 umstellt und den Strukturalismus für die erste Ausgabe in 1976 plant.
Piet Blom In einem Gespräch frage ich Piet Blom, ob er sich beteiligen möchte an einer Ausgabe über den Strukturalismus. Ich erzähle ihm auch, dass Herman Hertzberger Publikationsmaterial vom Altersheim "De Drie Hoven" liefert. Auf diese Bemerkung reagiert Piet Blom sehr emotionell: " 'De Drie Hoven', das ist faschistisch, da mache ich nicht mit." Erst später habe ich erfahren, dass sich 1962 eine heftige Faschismus-Diskussion abgespielt hat beim Team-10-Kongress in Royaumont. Scheinbar hat diese Diskussion bis 1975 nachgewirkt bei Piet Blom. Bei der Präsentation der Kubushäuser in Helmond sehe ich Piet Blom erneut, diesmal in einer ausgeglichenen und aufgeweckten Stimmung.
John Habraken Für das vorläufige Inhaltverzeichnis des B+W 1/1976 frage ich Herman Hertzberger um einen kritischen Kommentar. Er nennt zwei Punkte. Erstens soll ich Jan Verhoeven besuchen, da er viele Modellfotos von Konfigurationen besitzt. Zweitens sagt er: "Du darfst John Habraken nicht vergessen." Ich erwidere ihm, dass ich die SAR-Diskussionen und Projekte kenne, diese aber nicht in meine Ausgabe aufnehmen möchte. Daraufhin gibt mir Herman Hertzberger den Rat: "Aber du solltest 'Die Träger und die Menschen' lesen."
Arnaud Beerends Beerends ist wahrscheinlich der erste, der 1969 und 1973 den Begriff Strukturalismus in der niederländischen Fachliteratur eingeführt hat. Ich nehme mit ihm telefonisch Kontakt auf. Er reagiert freundlich, gibt aber wenig Informationen preis und verweist mich nach dem Architekturhistoriker Geert Bekaert in Antwerpen, der von der neuen niederländischen Strömung viel mehr wissen soll. Geert Bekaert ist einer der wenigen, der nicht reagiert. Über Arnaud Beerends erfahre ich später, dass er nicht als Architekt ausgebildet ist, sondern als Bildhauer und Maler an der Reichsakademie für Bildende Künste in Amsterdam. Bei seiner Interpretation des niederländischen Strukturalismus spielen gestalterische Qualitäten eine wichtige Rolle. Er sagt um 1970 auch, dass die Strukturalisten die gleiche Chance erhalten sollten wie die Expressionisten der 1920er Jahre.
Jürgen Joedicke Neben seiner Tätigkeit als Professor an der TU Stuttgart ist Jürgen Joedicke auch Herausgeber der “Dokumente der Modernen Architektur” und Redaktor bei der Zeitschrift B+W. Im deutschsprachigen Raum sind wenig Leute so gut orientiert über die niederländische Architektur und das Team 10 wie Jürgen Joedicke. Dank seiner umfassenden Kenntnis und Handlungsweise ist er beim Aufkommen und der Verbreitung des Strukturalismus wesentlich mitbeteiligt. Im Gegensatz zu Arnaud Beerends, der mit einer 9-köpfigen Redaktion Rechnung halten muss, verlaufen meine Kontakte unkompliziert und reibungslos via Jürgen Joedicke als einzigen und entscheidenden Redaktor.
1976 Im gleichen Zeitpunkt als in München und Zürich die Themanummer "Strukturalismus" im B+W 1/1976 erscheint, besteht an der TU Delft ein Konflikt zwischen einer Gruppe Marxisten und fünf Professoren, darunter Aldo van Eyck und Herman Hertzberger. Diese Professoren werden durch die Gruppe für mehr als ein Jahr vertrieben. Die Existenz und die Macht der Marxisten in Delft ist eine Folge der 1968er Bewegung. Damit wird angedeutet, dass die Forum-Architekten in dieser Zeit nicht die tonangebenden Repräsentanten der Architekturabteilung sind. Trotz verschiedener Widerstände gelingt es vor allem Herman Hertzberger mit seinen Vorlesungen einen spürbaren Einfluss auszuüben auf die Architektenausbildung.
1980 Im Oktober 1980 erscheint mein Buch "Strukturalismus in Architektur und Städtebau". Das Erscheinungsdatum im Buch (1981) stimmt nicht ganz überein mit der Wirklichkeit. Obwohl sich Aldo van Eyck nie zu den Strukturalisten zählt, leistet er einen der grössten persönlichen Beiträge zu diesem Buch von allen beteiligten Architekten. Dabei geht es ihm vor allem um die Präzisierung seiner Texte. Die vielen Bearbeitungen hat er mit farbigen Filzstiften auf Transparentpapier angegeben. Beim letzten Bericht schreibt er: "Möchte für so viel Arbeit Exemplare. Viel Glück A.v.Eyck."

II     Strukturalismus: Formale und ideologische Aspekte
Formale Merkmale
Zusammenhang, Wachstum und Veränderung.
Gliederung der Baumasse mit Gestaltqualität.
Die Stadtstruktur muss leicht erfassbar sein für die Bewohner, zur Orientierung.
Strukturmittel im Städtebau sind: Verkehrslinien (u.a. Gridironpläne), symmetrische Anlagen, Plätze, auffallende Gebäude, Flussläufe, Seeufer, Grünzonen, Hügel usw.
[Gegen das willkürliche Bauen, bei dem Zusammenhang und Grundstruktur für Erweiterungen fehlen]

Streit gegen das Amorphe
Von einem bestimmten Bauvolumen an ist ein städtebauliches Strukturprinzip notwendig,
vergleiche die 2 unterschiedlichen Projekte des Völkerbundpalastes von Le Corbusier sowie Hannes Meyer & Hans Wittwer.
Wie oben erwähnt ist eine leicht einprägsame Grundstruktur erforderlich für Übersichtlichkeit und Orientierung der Bewohner.
[Gegen den Häuserbrei, das städtebauliche Chaos und das Stadtgeschwür]

Städtebauliche Grundkonzeption
Sinn für Plätze-Konzeption
Stadtinterieure, auch bei Aussenräumen
Das Gestalt gewordene Zwischen, beim
Übergang vom privaten zum öffentlichen Raum, Möglichkeit für Begegnungen
[Gegen die interieur-lose "Raum-Zeit-Konzeption" von Sigfried Giedion]

Benutzerpartizipation
Identität der Bewohner
“Feeling that you are somebody living somewhere” (Peter Smithson)
Polyvalente Form und individuelle Einfüllung (vgl. Langue et Parole von Ferdinand de Saussure)
2-Komponenten-Bauweise
Die erste Komponente ist konstant, die zweite Komponente ist variabel.
Die erste Komponente entspricht dem langen Lebenszyklus, die zweite dem weniger langen Zyklus (Herman Hertzberger).
[Gegen die Uniformität im Wohnungsbau]

Erscheinungsbild 1
Ästhetik der Anzahl
Konfigurative Architektur, ähnlich wie Zellgewebe
Die Aussenseite hat sich nicht verändert (Waisenhaus, Centraal Beheer, Kasbah).

Erscheinungsbild 2
Identität der Bewohner
“Feeling that you are somebody living somewhere” (Peter Smithson)
Polyvalente Form und individuelle Einfüllung (vgl. Langue et Parole von Ferdinand de Saussure)
2-Komponenten-Bauweise
Die erste Komponente ist konstant, die zweite Komponente ist variabel.
Die erste Komponente entspricht dem langen Lebenszyklus, die zweite dem weniger langen Zyklus (Herman Hertzberger).
[Gegen die Uniformität im Wohnungsbau]

Menschbild
Der Ausgangspunkt für die Architektur ist das archetypische Verhalten des Menschen in der Gemeinschaft (vgl. Claude Lévi-Strauss). Das Team Ten nennt sich "Arbeitsgruppe für die Untersuchung der Beziehungen zwischen sozialen und gebauten Strukturen."

III     Städtebauliche Strukturen, projektierte und realisierte Beispiele (vom Team 10 und andern Architekten) 

Hendrik Berlage



Ernst May u.a.

Cornelis van Eesteren

Le Corbusier

Van den Broek
& Bakema





Alison & Peter
Smithson


Womersley u.a

Kenzo Tange

Atelier 5

Yona Friedman

Candilis
Josic
& Woods

Aldo van Eyck

Piet Blom


Archigram

Stefan Wewerka

Siegfried Nassuth

Moshe Safdie

Herman Hertzberger

Verhoeven u.a.

James Stirling

Ralph Erskine

Adriaan Geuze

Rem Koolhaas

Amsterdam-Süd, 1915-30. Erfolgreiche Struktur, Architektur durch die Expressionisten der Amsterdamer Schule.
[blau=realisierte Beispiele]


Wohnsiedlung Goldstein Frankfurt, 1929

Allgemeiner Ausbreitungsplan Amsterdam AUP, 1934-70 (teilweise Problemgebiete)

Plan Obus beim "Fort l'Empereur" in Algier, 1934 (Mitbestimmung)

Pendrecht, 1949
Lijnbaan Rotterdam, 1952-54
Alexanderpolder, 1956
Leeuwarden-Noord, 1959-63 (Variante auf das Projekt Alexanderpolder)
Eindhoven 't Hool, 1962-72
Buikslotermeer Amsterdam, Projekt 1963

Clustercity Golden Lane London, 1953
Städtebauschema 1953: Haus, Strasse, Distrikt, Stadt
Berlin Hauptstadt, 1958

Sheffield, 1955-65

Tokyo-Bay-Plan, 1960 (Utopieprojekt)

Halen Bern, 1961

Raumstadt, 1961 (Utopieprojekt)

Toulouse-Le Mirail, 1961-71
Freie Universität Berlin, 1963-73
Römerberg Frankfurt, 1963

Buikslotermeer Amsterdam, Projektschema, 1962

Arche Noah, Studienprojekt, 1962 (kritisiert vom Team Ten)
Kasbah Hengelo, 1973

Plug-in-City, 1964-66 (Utopieprojekt)

Ruhwald Berlin, 1965

Bijlmermeer Amsterdam, 1966-heute (teilweise Problemgebiet)

Habitat 67 Montréal, 1967

Siedlungsplan und acht Wohnungen Diagoon Delft, 1971 (Mitbestimmung)

Berkel-Rodenrijs, 1973

Runcorn New Town, 1974

Byker, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 1968-81

Borneo Sporenburg Amsterdam, 2000 (Mitbestimmung)

Wohnprojekt in Singapur, 2008


IV     Anmerkungen zur Trabantenstadt Bijlmermeer in Amsterdam (grosse Bienenwabenstruktur) 

Bei Ausbildungsstätten für Architektur und Städtebau werden schon heute verschiedene der oben genannten Projekte als Studienmaterial für Studenten verwendet. Von den gewählten Projekten stammt ein ansehnlicher Teil aus den Niederlanden. Neben den vielen vorbildlichen Beispielen ist in diesem Land auch eine Problemstadt entstanden, die Trabantenstadt Bijlmermeer (Bijlmer). Die Situation hat sich in der Zwischenzeit verbessert, da die Trabantenstadt für mehr als die Hälfte wieder abgebrochen und durch eine andere Architektur ersetzt ist. Die Nachvollziehung der verschiedenen Etappen des Bijlmers könnte ein interessanter Lehrmoment für junge Städteplaner sein.
1962 Beginn der Entwurfsphase des Bijlmers unter Leitung des wenig erfahrenen Städtebau-Beamten Siegfried Nassuth, der durch Cornelis van Eesteren ausgebildet ist. Da es sich beim Bijlmer um ein grosses und komplexes Städtebauprojekt handelt, hätte sich das damals bekannteste Städtebaubüro der Niederlande, das Büro Van den Broek und Bakema, in irgend einer Weise an diesem Grossprojekt beteiligen sollen.
1966 Beginn der Bauphase. Im Modell sieht die Bienenwabenstruktur sehr ansprechend aus, auch für Politiker.
Die Ausführungskosten scheinen günstig zu sein.
1968 Einzug der ersten Bewohner.
1975 Die alte niederländische Kolonie Suriname wird unabhängig und viele Einwohner benützen die Chance, um nach Amsterdam zu ziehen. Weil die Wohnungen im Bijlmer durch die einheimischen Niederländer nicht geschätzt sind, bleiben sie leer. Vielen Surinamern wird eine Wohnung im Bijlmer zugewiesen. Nach einer gewissen Zeit erhält der Bijlmer den Beinamen "das Ghetto der Niederlande" mit viel Kriminalität und Drugs.
1992 Crash einer Boeing in die Wabenstruktur.
1998 Der Städteplaner Siegfried Nassuth, der sich sein Leben lang mit dem Bijlmer beschäftigt hat, erhält für seine Arbeit am Städtebauplan den Oeuvrepreis des Fonds für Kunst, Design und Architektur. Das ist eine Art Staatspreis. Der Steuerzahler hat Mühe mit dieser Belohnung, weil der Bijlmer und sein teilweiser Abbruch ebenfalls vom Staat mitfinanziert ist.
2004 In der Zeitung "Trouw" werden aktuelle Zahlen des Bijlmers genannt. Von den ursprünglich gebauten 12'500 Hochbau-Wohnungen sind inzwischen 6'500 wieder abgebrochen (52%). Anstelle der abgebrochenen Hochbau-Wohnungen stehen heute 7'000 Wohnungen mit Garten in Niedrigbauweise. Beim Endzustand sieht man eine frappante Ähnlichkeit mit dem Stadtteil Toulouse-Le Mirail von 1961-71, der in einer einzigen Phase realisiert ist durch die erfahrenen Städtebauer Candilis Josic & Woods.
2009 Die Stadt Amsterdam hat Probleme mit grossen Projekten wie: der Bijlmer, die Restaurierung des Reichsmuseums, der Neubau des Stedelijk Museum und die neue Metro für den nördlichen Stadtteil. Im Zusammenhang mit dem letzten Projekt kommt der Bürgermeister von Amsterdam im Jahr 2009 zur folgenden Feststellung: "Wir sind schlussendlich alle zusammen Amateure."


V     Anmerkungen zum Städtebau in den Niederlanden 
Zu den bekannten Städteplanern der Niederlande gehören: Hendrik Berlage, Cornelis van Eesteren, Van den Broek & Bakema, Siegfried Nassuth und einige jüngere Städteplaner, die als Landschaftsarchitekten ausgebildet sind wie Adriaan Geuze, Winy Maas usw. Bei dieser Reihe fällt auf, dass die erfolgreichen Städtebauprojekte oft durch Architekten als freie Unternehmer entstanden sind. Die Resultate der Städtebau-Beamten Cornelis van Eesteren und Siegfried Nassuth in Amsterdam (sowie neuerdings auch Maarten Schmitt in Den Haag) haben vielfach zu Problemen geführt mit unnötigen Kosten.
Nach dem grossen Städtebau-Boom der letzten 20-30 Jahre ist es Zeit, sich kritisch aufzustellen gegenüber den neuen Resultaten. Wenn ich an die Stadt Den Haag denke, dann frage ich mich, ob eine bedeutende historische Stadtsilhouette mit Wasserpartie beim Nationalen Regierungszentrum visuell ruiniert werden darf durch zu nahestehende Wolkenkratzer.
Dass Städtebau von freien Unternehmern nicht zwangsläufig zu erfolgreichen Resultaten führen muss, beweist der Beitrag von Rob Krier in Den Haag, der in Zusammenarbeit mit Stadtrat und Städtebau-Beamten entstanden ist. Rob Kriers stimmungsvolle Perspektivzeichnungen sind noch keine Garantie für gute Stadträume, die durch die Bewohner geschätzt werden. Der Qualitätsunterschied zu den erfolgreichen Stadträumen von Berlage und den niederländischen Expressionisten der 1920er Jahre ist offensichtlich. Der gesamten neuen städtebaulichen Grundrissgestaltung (Stadtstruktur) ist zudem viel zuwenig Aufmerksamkeit geschenkt. Das ist ein oft vorkommendes Übel, auch bei andern Stadterneuerungen.

VI     Nachschrift vom 1. Dezember 2009 

Das Symposium "Structuralism Reloaded" vom 19.-21. November 2009 in München wird wahrscheinlich bei den meisten Teilnehmern in positiver Erinnerung bleiben. Der Erfolg kommt vor allem durch die vielen eindrücklichen Vorträge, von denen mich einzelne besonders ansprechen. Zuerst denke ich an Tomas Valena, den Organisator des Symposiums, mit seiner informativen Einleitung. Im Weiteren spricht Jörg Gleiter über den Strukturalismus "avant la lettre" und über verborgene Strukturen. Die Vorlesung von Herman Hertzberger, einem der bedeutendsten Vertreter des Strukturalismus, entspricht seinem gewohnten hohen Niveau. Der jüngere Architekt Winy Maas gibt eine Präsentation, die an eine pop-artige Show erinnert. Bei Inderbir Singh Riar aus den US wird das Habitat '67 in Montréal in einer vorbildlichen Kombination von Vortrag, geschriebenen Zitaten und Bildern behandelt. Im letzten Teil geht Toni Kotnik auf die Relativität des Computer-Designs ein. Seine Story ist intelligent, ironisch und humoristisch zugleich und dank seiner breiten Computererfahrung gut unterlegt. Dieser letzte Vortrag ist im Stil eines “intellektuellen Cabarets”.
Neben dem Symposium hat mir in München noch etwas Anderes grossen Eindruck gemacht, nämlich die vorbildliche Erhaltung der historischen Altstadt. Bei einer Wanderung durch das Stadtzentrum mit Hofgärten fällt auf, dass die historischen Stadtsilhouetten noch unbeschädigt sind (ohne zu nahestehende Hochhäuser). Eine andere Erfahrung habe ich in meiner eigenen Stadt Den Haag, die eine "Wereldstad aan Zee" werden möchte. In diesem Zusammenhang ist auf ein Spannungsfeld von zwei verschiedenen städtebaulichen Denkmodellen zu weisen. Einerseits ist es der positiv zu wertende Konservatismus bei der Altstadt von München und anderseits die negativ zu wertende Progressivität bei der Altstadt von Den Haag. Diese Stadt ist heute das städtebauliche Experimentierfeld von Rem Koolhaas geworden. Hier versucht er die Ideen seiner Generic City zu realisieren, wobei eine unerwünschte Massstabsverirrung auftritt (Dubai-Syndrom). Beim Hauptbahnhof in der Nähe des historischen Zentrums möchte Koolhaas u.a. eine Riesenspinne (M-gebouw) bauen, als Monument seines eigenen Egos. Jeder Bahnreisende wird gezwungen sein, unter dieser Riesenspinne durchzugehen, bevor er seine Zugreise beginnt.
Strukturalismus hat vor allem mit Städtebau zu tun. Es ist Zeit, dass die Ideen des weltweit adorierten Rem Koolhaas hinterfragt werden, besonders auch darum, weil ihn die historisch gewachsene Stadt in Europa nicht interessiert. Vielleicht könnte eine Europareise nach Paris, München, Bern oder Amsterdam, wo die historischen Stadtsilhouetten noch unbeschädigt sind, die Augen von Rem Koolhaas aus Rotterdam öffnen. Google Maps